FULL NAME:

Malcolm R. Stotts

ARMY SERIAL NUMBER (ASN):

0-022732

  • DATE OF BIRTH: October 25, 1912
  • DATE OF DEATH: June 13, 1944
RESIDENCE (DURING WWII)

San Francisco, California

ORGANIZATION
  • MAIN UNIT:
    38th Infantry Regiment
  • SUBUNIT:
    Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion
RANK / POSITION IN UNIT (LAST KNOWN)
  • RANK:
    Lieutenant Colonel (Lt. Col.)
  • POSITION IN UNIT:
    Battalion Commander
BATTLES AND CAMPAIGNS

✭ Normandy Campaign (6 June – 24 July 1944)

SUMMARY OF HIS SERVICE

Malcolm R. Stotts was born on October 25, 1912 in Missouri. Some years later, his family moved to San Francisco, California. In 1931 Malcolm began his studies at Montana College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. He also served as a manager of the university football team but he was very unlucky. Malcolm broke his leg twice in the first two football seasons and spent most of the time in hospital. After graduation from the University Malcolm started teaching and was active in the choir. He loved music, which was fully reflected in 1943-1944 when his 38th Infantry Regiment was stationed in Northern Ireland. Malcolm regularly organized great celebrations and church services not only for his soldiers, but also for the people of County Armagh who loved him. The death of Malcolm Stotts was a severe blow to the people of County Armagh, who still fondly remember him.

STATUS
  • CATEGORY:
    Killed in action (KIA)
  • DATE:
    June 13, 1944
  • LOCATION:
    Near Saint-Georges-d'Elle, France
  • NOTES:
    “About three days before I was hit our Battalion was advancing inland from the beach and suddenly we ran into tough opposition. The going is very slow and costly. I was with Colonel Stotts, which is my normal position as Co. Commander of the heavy weapons company. I had a messenger and a Sergeant of communications, with me. Colonel Stotts was sitting up against a hedgerow - with me and the other two lying flat on the ground in a semicircle about him. There were a few mortar shells falling very close and snipers are always busy. Col. Stotts told me to check on a company on the left. I got up and started latterly across to the company mentioned, under cover of the hedgerow. I hadn’t gone ten feet when a terrific explosion knocked me to the ground. My ears were ringing and I thought I was hit because I could feel a very stinging sensation in my back and the seat of my pants. It was only clods of dirt kicked up by the explosion. I looked around and saw a hole in the ground replacing my place in the semicircle. I continued on my mission and on the way back I heard that my messenger and the Sergeant had been evacuated full of shell fragments. I went on back to report to Col. Stotts. He was leaning against the hedgerow as before only very still. I laid him out on the ground and put his helmet over his face; It was the last order he ever gave," stated Capt. Halland W. Hankel in his letter dated July 19, 1944
HONORED BY:

Mrs. Christine Tyrrell from Warrenpoint, Northern Ireland

NARA - Display Full Records

File Unit: Electronic Army Serial Number Merged File, ca. 1938 - 1946 (Enlistment Records)
in the Series: World War II Army Enlistment Records, created 6/1/2002 - 9/30/2002, documenting the period ca. 1938 - 1946. - Record Group 64 (info)

Brief Scope: This series contains records of approximately nine million men and women who enlisted in the United States Army, including the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps.

Source: aad.archives.gov/aad/
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